Which TRX Suspension Trainer Is The Best?

Today I’m going to provide a comparison of the 3 models of TRX Suspension Trainer to help you determine which TRX is the best one for you. I own all 3 models, and use them every day in my bootcamps, and Online Workouts.

Over the last couple of years, the TRX Suspension Trainer has become my “Go To” piece of exercise equipment for all types of clients. The TRX Suspension Trainer is perfect for training individuals just getting back into movement, or well-conditioned athletes. You can instantly modify the difficulty for any fitness type or ability by adjusting the angle of your bodyweight in relation to the anchor point that the Suspension Trainer is attached to.

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TRX Home Suspension Trainer

The TRX Home Suspension Trainer is marketed to individuals who want to workout at home or on the road. It includes 6 mix and match downloadable/streamable workouts.

TRX Pro Suspension Trainer

The TRX Pro Suspension Trainer is marketed towards trainers and coaches looking for the perfect mix of durable, high-use gear and content to train clients and athletes of all abilities and levels. It includes a trainer basics video.

TRX Force Suspension Trainer

The TRX Force Suspension Trainer is marketed towards tactical athletes who want to take the guess-work out of their routines with a comprehensive 12-week conditioning program designed to develop strength, endurance, power, and mobility.

TRX Suspension Trainer Comparison

Update 12/14/15 – The TRX Force Kit is now also $249.95

Which TRX Suspension Trainer Is Best?

Check out other TRX articles on JohnnyFit!

Which TRX Is The Best?

The difference between the TRX Suspension Trainer themselves is minimal. The Pro Suspension Trainer is designed to handle more force than the Home Suspension Trainer, and The Force Suspension Trainer is designed to handle more force than the other two.

Suspension Trainer Wear and Tear

After using all 3 Suspension Trainers vigorously, and side-by-side with groups of people for over a year, there is no noticeable difference between the wear and tear of each one.

Design of the Suspension Trainer Handles and Cradles

Besides the ability to handle more force, the design of the handles are different for the Home version vs. the Pro and Force versions.

I like the handle of the Pro and Force versions better than the Home version, but I don’t think that the handle alone is worth the $50, or $100 difference. After a year of continual use in my bootcamps, no handle of any model is worse for wear and tear.

TRX Home GripTRX Force Grip

The Force Suspension Trainer has a wider cradle area to handle the insertion of boots. I like to work out with minimalist footwear, and sometimes I find it harder to keep the cradle of the Force from sliding over my heel, and up my leg.

Extender Straps and Videos

I rarely use the extender strap the comes with the Pro and Force kits, and for home purposes, I doubt that you will either.

I can’t speak for the app that now comes with the Force kit, because I purchased mine prior to the app being included.

The videos that come with the Pro and Force kits are great, but if you’re a trainer that’s already taken the Suspension Trainer, or Group Suspension Trainer certification courses, then it’s unlikely that you’ll see any moves that you haven’t seen before. Also, most of what you can find on those videos can also be found on YouTube.

Conclusion:

Which TRX Suspension Trainer is right for you?

Overall, if money is the limiting factor, you’ll be just fine going with the Home Suspension Trainer. Like I said, I use it side by side with the other Suspension Trainers all day, and with all types of clients. It’s held up just as well as the others.

No matter which one you choose, I would highly recommend that you take one of the certification courses if you’re a trainer. I found it extremely helpful. If you’re just a home fitness enthusiast, I would recommend hiring a certified TRX trainer to show you some exercises. Try the TRX workouts in my Online Bootcamp! There is quite a bit of nuance to core engagement that you could miss if you’re not instructed properly.

Let me know in the comments below if I left anything out, or if you have any other questions about the TRX Suspension Trainers. I’m happy to help.

5 thoughts on “Which TRX Suspension Trainer Is The Best?”

  1. Johnny, there’s one other piece of TRX equipment I’m interested in that I haven’t heard you talk about — the Rip Trainer. As you may know, it’s a stick with a stretchy cord attached to one end. The other end of the cord anchors to a pole or other point, allowing you to do resisted rotational exercises. It’s analogous to using a cable bar attached to one of those pricey cable machines. Tonight (May 27) until 11:59 pm Pacific Time, TRX is still having their Memorial Day sale — which leaves me (at this writing) one hour and a few minutes to decide whether to spring for it. I do use my TRX Force for some good rotational exercises (including that great 180-degree thing I learned from you) but “transverse plane” rotation — aka twisting — is basically the Rip’s entire purpose, so I thought it might be a worthwhile addition. If you happen to see this before midnight tonight (Tuesday) and have any thoughts about this thing, I’d love to hear them. Thanks.

    1. I have a little bit of experience with the RIP Trainer. I don’t currently have them at my studio mainly due to a lack of space. I typically use resistance bands for the types of rotational movement that I would use the RIP Trainer for, rotational and transverse movement.

      Overall, I think that it’s a fine piece of equipment to add to your arsenal. You can order different coords for the RIP trainer, and if you’re a decently fit guy, I would go with the heavier one. My experience with the medium strength coord, was that it was lacking on some exercises.

      I know this didn’t get posted before the end of their sale, but they run sales fairly frequently. I wouldn’t be surprised to see one pop up for Independence Day, which is of course right around the corner!

      Let me know if you get one, and what your thoughts are!

      1. Thanks for your thoughts, Johnny. After agonizing about this (really, this should be my biggest problem in life) until nearly midnight last night, I finally did place the order. Additionally, I ordered both the X-Heavy and XX-Heavy cords (I read your mind). The Rip comes with the Medium, described as being 20 pounds. The “Heavy” is 25 pounds so I skipped it as too close to the Medium (maybe I should have gotten it), while the two I ordered — X-Heavy @ supposedly 38 lbs and XX-Heavy @ 50 pounds — seemed like they should do nicely. I frankly don’t see why I couldn’t add a carabiner to the end loop of the stick to enable putting more than one cord on at a time, as you could, say, with Bodylastics bands. But TRX won’t endorse doing that, and maybe with the heavy cords I got, one will be more than enough anyway. Thanks again.

        – Steve

      2. Since my previous reply has disappeared, here it is with an update at the end:

        Johnny, got my Rip Trainer just under a week ago, and here’s what I think so
        far.

        I love its simplicity. Fundamentally, it’s all about one thing: Rotation,
        either applying it or resisting it. Though there are many potential exercises,
        most are variations on a single theme, and they all blast your core. Even
        something like a squat press is really not about legs or chest. It’s all about
        core, as the asymmetrical, one-sided load forces you to resist the pull that
        wants to twist you. (There are exercises that aren’t asymmetrical, where you
        hook the other end of the cord to the eyebolt at the other end of the RIP, then
        stand on the cord and do various things. I haven’t tried any of those yet.)

        I like that it stores down so small and can be taken anywhere, though I’m
        currently just using it at home, anchored to the leg of a grand piano. I’d note
        its intensity: I can see using this for Tabatas or other High Intensity Interval
        training. I think the storage bag, which is nylon and opens at the top via a
        drawstring, leaves something to be desired. I was lucky enough to find a better
        bag at a thrift store for $1.99, one that is canvas and zips open halfway for
        easier insertion of the RIP and its cord. (Since it’s unlikely anyone would ever
        find such a thing again, I’d recommend considering any of a number of Yoga Mat
        Bags, which you can find on Amazon or even in Target stores.)

        TRX suggests that you can use the RIP without a strap anchor as you would on
        the suspension trainer, by just wrapping the cord around a pole or other anchor
        point and then clipping it back onto itself. I don’t like that method and use my
        suspension trainer strap to anchor the thing. I think for the price they get for
        this thing, they should include such a strap, not force you to either do without
        or pay extra to get an anchor strap. (They do include a door anchor, however.)
        I’d note that I’ve seen TRX videos where they clip the carabiner of the RIP directly to one of those X Mounts they sell, which puzzles me since they counsel never to do that with the suspension trainer but rather to always put an anchor strap through the X Mount and then clip the carabiner to the strap.

        I’m currently using the Medium cord that comes with the RIP, and so far it
        seems intense enough, especially since you can increase its resistance just by
        stretching it further out. I’ll use that until it no longer seems adequate, if
        ever, and then I’ll step up to Heavy. (I already have the X Heavy and the XX
        Heavy. Should have ordered the Heavy too, but didn’t.)

        I look at the RIP leaning against my wall and think: I just paid HOW MUCH …
        FOR A STICK? (I’d note that even when TRX isn’t offering a 20% off deal at its
        site, you can get that same deal from TRX through Amazon.) But like the
        suspension trainer, also amazingly overpriced, once you get used to using it,
        you forget about what you paid and you just can’t imagine being without it. It’s
        a life changer.

        I’d caution people to use the safety strap, since if this thing slips out of
        your hand, it could probably knock your teeth out. It’s tempting not to use the
        strap because you want to switch hands back and forth quickly, but using it is
        safer for your face.

        I’ve seen YouTube guys make their own version of a RIP, either by screwing an
        eyebolt into the end of an ax handle or other long tool handle from the hardware
        store or by threading a chain through a pipe and putting a carabiner at each end
        of the chain. You can then buy a cord from TRX or use something like Bodylastics
        stretch bands. If that fits your budget, I think it’s a reasonable choice, but
        I’d rather have the real thing, if only because that “TRX” label carries a
        certain magic and mystic that motivates me, and because there are certain
        practical benefits as well, such as eyebolts that rotate, a stick that breaks in
        half, and the right amount of weight and heft (not to mention that safety
        strap).

        So far, I like it a lot.

        UPDATE: Yesterday, tried using the RIP for Tabatas, doing just a single exercise — squat and (forward) press — doing right hand twice, then switching to left twice, then right, then left, for, of course, a total of 8 rounds and 4 minutes. It was as brutal as Tabatas with a battle rope and so I think the RIP would be worth having even just for that one purpose.
        – Steve

  2. Johnny, got my Rip Trainer just under a week ago, and here’s what I think so far.
    I love its simplicity. Fundamentally, it’s all about one thing: Rotation, either applying it or resisting it. Though there are many potential exercises, most are variations on a single theme, and they all blast your core. Even something like a squat press is really not about legs or chest. It’s all about core, as the asymmetrical, one-sided load forces you to resist the pull that wants to twist you. (There are exercises that aren’t asymmetrical, where you hook the other end of the cord to the eyebolt at the other end of the RIP, then stand on the cord and do various things. I haven’t tried any of those yet.)
    I like that it stores down so small and can be taken anywhere, though I’m currently just using it at home, anchored to the leg of a grand piano. I’d note its intensity: I can see using this for Tabatas or other High Intensity Interval training. I think the storage bag, which is nylon and opens at the top via a drawstring, leaves something to be desired. I was lucky enough to find a better bag at a thrift store for $1.99, one that is canvas and zips open halfway for easier insertion of the RIP and it’s cord. (Since it’s unlikely anyone would ever find such a thing again, I’d recommend considering any of a number of Yoga Mat Bags, which you can find on Amazon or even in Target stores.)
    TRX suggests that you can use the RIP without a strap anchor as you would on the suspension trainer, by just wrapping the cord around a pole or other anchor point and then clipping it back onto itself. I don’t like that method and use my suspension trainer strap to anchor the thing. I think for the price they get for this thing, they should include such a strap, not force you to either do without or pay extra to get an anchor strap. (I’d note that I’ve seen TRX videos where they clip the carabiner of the RIP directly to one of those X Mounts they sell, which puzzles me since they counsel never to do that with the suspension trainer but rather to always put an anchor strap through the X Mount and then clip the carabiner to the strap.)
    I’m currently using the Medium cord that comes with the RIP, and so far it seems intense enough, especially since you can increase its resistance just be stretching it further out. I’ll use that until it no longer seems adequate, if ever, and then I’ll step up to Heavy. (I already have the X Heavy and the XX Heavy. Should have ordered the Heavy too, but didn’t.)
    I look at the RIP leaning against my wall and think: I just paid HOW MUCH … FOR A STICK? (I’d note that even when TRX isn’t offering a 20% off deal at its site, you can get that same deal from TRX through Amazon.) But like the suspension trainer, also amazingly overpriced, once you get used to using it, you forget about what you paid and you just can’t imagine being without it. It’s a life changer.
    I’d caution people to use the safety strap, since if this thing slips out of your hand, it could probably knock your teeth out. It’s tempting not to use the strap because you want to switch hands back and forth quickly, but using it is safer for your face.
    I’ve seen YouTube guys make their own, either by screwing an eyebolt into the end of an ax handle or other long handle from the hardware store or by threading a chain through a pipe and putting a carabiner at each end of the chain. You can then buy a cord from TRX or use something like Bodylastics stretch bands. If that fits your budget, I think it’s a reasonable choice, but I’d rather have the real thing, if only because that “TRX” label carries a certain magic and mystic that motivates me, and because there are certain practical benefits as well, such as eyebolts that rotate, a stick that breaks in half, and the right amount of weight and heft.
    So far, I like it a lot.

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