Kettlebell Metric System – Convert Kilograms to Pounds

Some of you who are just getting into kettlebells might have some confusion about the metric system and decide to shop for brands that have their bells in pounds. This is understandable but unfortunate as most of the better quality ones use the metric system.

Kettlebell Metric System

Kettlebell Metric System

This article features the most common conversions from the metric system to pounds. I also took the liberty of rounding to the nearest pound.

Kettlebell Conversion – Convert kilograms to Pounds

kilograms

/

pounds

4 9
8 18
12 27
16 35
20 44
24 53
28 62
36 79
44 97

 

Ultimately, the major difference in brands come down to the way the handle feels in your grip, a flat bottom to prevent the bell from rolling on you in certain moves, and rough areas left from the casting process. Also, with poorly constructed handles, you might find a bell that rests on your forearm uncomfortably.

I hope you find this chart useful.

If you’re shopping around for an exceptional quality kettlebell, then let me suggest Dragon Door kettlebells.

 

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  • cheryl wilinski

    Hi Johnny,
    What would you recommend for a beginner kettlebell user. I have heard that a lot of people choose a kettlebell weight and it’s too low, so have to purchase another get the best workout. I’m sure its hard to advise without other factors like personal strength and such.. I just want to try to make the best weight choice the first time around.
    Thanks
    Cheryl

    • http://www.johnnyfit.com JohnnyFit

      Hi Cheryl, I cover this topic somewhat in my article When To Get A Heavier Kettlebell http://www.johnnyfit.com/kettlebells/kettlebells-when-to-get-a-heavier-kettlebell.html/. Basically, I like to use the overhead press as a baseline for choosing a weight because it’s generally the weakest move in a sequence of moves.

      I’m sure that you can swing a much heavier bell than you can press, but if you use the swing as a baseline, you limit the variety of moves that you can perform (when you have only 1 kettlebell). To compensate for this for other moves when you can use a heavier bell, I suggest increasing reps, or rather doing a “time based” exercise as opposed to a “rep based” one.

      The time based approach translates nicely to fit into the goals that most people have when approaching kettlebell training: to tone up and shed bodyfat.

      Let me know if you have any questions!